About Chase

Chase Jarvis is well known as a visionary photographer, director, and social artist. He is widely recognized for re-imagining, examining, and redefining the intersection of art and popular culture through still and moving pictures. While commercial work for brands like Nike, Pepsi, Volvo, Reebok, Apple, and Red Bull have earned him recognition from the International Photography Awards, The Advertising Photographers of America, Prix de la Photographie Paris, and numerous other industry buzz centers, his recent push into personal work and fine art has rapidly gained the attention of curators and art critics, mainstream audiences, and celebrity circles worldwide. The online hub for Jarvis and his work is at http://www.chasejarvis.com. Follow him on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/chasejarvis
Author Archive | Chase

Commitment to Creativity — Dreamland with Bob Burnquist is Some Next Level Shit

I had a chance to photograph Bob in Brazil couple years ago for Oakley and we couldn’t pull it together

Let’s just say this video galvanizes my regret.

This is some next level shit, Bob.. The intro is humble. The middle is stunning. And gotta say from experience that the helicopter stuff after the 6 min mark is supremely impressive.

This is what it means to be committed.

You?

The Big Dogs Are Wobbling Like Drunkards [Time for Us Small Dogs to Sharpen Our Knives]

If you’re looking for your next creative breakthrough or if you’re in a job you hate and looking to make a change, this video from Dan Wieden of legendary Wieden + Kennedy agency in Portland is a worthy 15 min of your time. The intro is slow (a Portland love fest…) so skip in a few min if you’re watching the clock.

Here’s what’s in this video that I like:

- dan is a really likeable guy
- dan’s speech echoes my belief that creativity is the new literacy
- dan eloquently voices the idea that constraints & failures lead to creativity
- small is beautiful
- mistakes are the building blocks of knowledge

Take a look at some of the agency’s work over the years.

NEW Update from GoPro. Shoot, edit, and go social with photos + videos

Apparently as a followup to my well-timed and very handy video I put out this week (check it), my favorite camera manufacturer today announced the launch of a new app. It’s getting really slick my friendz. While you could control the Hero3 cameras with earlier version of the app (view – start -stop – etc) the newest version of the app allows you the same ability to control the camera, but you can now remotely view the images and videos on the camera and–here’s the kicker — edit + share them from the app for iphone, android, and windows phones.

ChaseJarvis_GoPro
From today’s TechCrunch article: “The app is simple enough. It connects to GoPro cams through a WiFi signal, giving owners a large set of available tools. The cameras can be viewed and controlled from a smartphone or tablet, for one –this includes adjusting the dozens of available settings on each little guy. Owners can also view, manage and download content from the camera to their phone. From there, it can be shared like any other media. Upload the action to Geocities or FriendFeed like you would any other picture.”

This update illustrates why I opened this post with “my favorite camera manufacturer”. It’s not because they are overwhelmingly the best. Sure I love them. Not sure I could make my living with just a GoPro, but truth be told it’s really what they stand for and where they’re going that make me love them the most. Like I told the New York Times a while back — it’s 5 years past due when Nikon and Canon should have had this sort of reliable technology built in small packages to allow creative photographers to shoot, edit, and share their work in new and novel ways.

Dear Canon and Nikon,
I know I’ve been telling you this stuff for 5+ years. I’m sure other pros and consultants and bean-counters have too. So why is this so hard?

ASIDE: given that you are reading this post, you’ll probably want to know how I pack my GoPro’s to travel everywhere I go. Here’s a quick post and a short vid.

AND here’s their cutsy little promo vid illustrating the emotional bits…

Creative Boot Camp for Your Summer Brain [a public service announcement]

creativeLIVE chase jarvis summer sale

This is a public service announcement that I think is valuable… I’m banking you know I’m co-founder over at creativeLIVE – where we’ve delivered more than 15 million viewer hours of creative education worldwide. (If you’re new, here’s stories about it in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, The Chicago Tribune, TechCrunch, AllThingsD, etc and stay tuned for my MSNBC segment coming in 2 weeks…)

This is a short-notice opportunity to take advantage of these long summer days –> Just got off the horn a short bit ago with the biz ops team over at cL and talked them into making creativeLIVE’s entire catalog of workshops discounted now through July 31 — some up to 50% off. That’s photo & video classes from your favs (joeyl, zack, vince, jasmine, sue, sal, tamara, etc etc), business classes for creatives, design, software training on all those damn creative apps the you love but drive you crazy, and lots of other goodness.

Investing in yourself is the best investment you can make.

Here’s a link to some of my fav courses of the sale (and click the big blue button over there to shop the entire catalog – all of which is discounted for the next 48 hours).

And the same deal goes for your friends. If you believe in what we’ve created at creativeLIVE — trying to make the world a more creative place — I would be humbly grateful if you shared the good word. Namaste (or whatever is better to say at the end of a post like this and happy summer camping for your creative brain).

[NEW] Free Music Downloads from chasejarvisLIVE bands

chasejarvis_mygoodnessI’ve heard through your shout-outs + tweets + views + comments n such that most of you love what we’re doing with music on #cjLIVE. Those of you who pay attention to the show might have noticed that we have been on a bit of a hot streak with new music over the past couple of years. Here’s a few of my fav highlights from the very earliest moments of these now well-known musicians:

_Macklemore & Ryan Lewis brought down the #cjLIVE house before you knew their name with tracks from their 10 million singles sold + independent platinum album The Heist such as “Can’t Hold Us”

_The Lumineers delivered a gorgeous version of their platinum hit “Ho Hey” 6 months before it was a hit.

_We Are Augustines rocked the studio with a series of live sets from “Rise Ye Sunken Ships.” and kicked off a worldwide tour with sold out dates across the US and Europe.

_Reignwolf melted our faces with a crushing performance “Bicycle” as part of our special Capitol Hill Block Party episode. Now he’s on fire too…

For years I’ve heard – ‘hey chase = why don’t you start a music label’… And truth be told, I thought about it for about a quarter of a hot second and then remembered that the music business is a gnarly business and…oh yeah…I’m a photographer. Duh. BUT… that doesn’t keep us from continuing to collaborate with emerging bands to highlight and distribute their music. So, while we’ve been all YouTube and uStream distribution to date, we are happy and proud to announce we will now be offering free downloads of some of this amazing music. First up in this endeavor is –MY GOODNESS– where we are offering downloads of their tracks filmed on our show, direct to you….Their performance on cjLIVE is here in video form, but now you can also download all these My Goodness audio tracks on SoundCloud FOR FREE. Please enjoy – go grab a track and share w your friends – it’s an amazing summer rock album.

Our plans include doing more of this in the future. Hope you dig it and thanks for being a part of our own little tiny #NoLabel movement.

my goodness chase jarvis

addendum for the music lovers….

Collaborating with these musicians and others has always been one of my favorite parts of the gig – exploring new music and sharing it with my friends. Little known fact: Macklemore first performed “Wings,” formerly known as “Air Jordans”, in my studio as a part of my Songs For Eating and Drinking underground series… The project is on hold right now, but the music and vids are still out there online. Check it.

chasejarvis TECH: How to Pack, Prep & Travel with GoPro Cameras (<—bonus, also works for almost camera system)

I’ve been shooting religiously with GoPro cameras since they came out way back in the day. Love those little monsters. At a minimum, I travel with three or more Hero3′s for any shoot – I’ve just found they just come in super-duper handy for all sortsa great stuff. BUT…. taking into account mounts, memory cards, chargers, spare batteries and all miscellany associated with the GoPro and you’ve got yourself quite a load of gear to keep track of.

That’s why I’ve come up with a pretty tight little system for packing & traveling with my GoPros. The above video really gives the full insight, but all cooked down into a tasty little reduction, it smells something like this:

1. Find ONE bag/pack that can carry everything (for Belize I brought a Dakine Mission)

2. Separate gear & accessories into smaller pouches (ThinkTank little pouches described in the vid work nicely here)

3. Clearly label said bags (make the labels moron proof – and really visible in low-light / bleary eyes / tired person can read them without question)

4. Take EVERYTHING in this bag with you every time, regardless of shoot location – you never know when the need/opportunity for a funky mount may arise. (I know this might not sound like good advice, but trust me, it is. Take it from me, this is the only way you’ll ever NOT forget something random.)

5. Get creative. There are tons of ways you can mount a GoPro (see the egg-timer and scuba mask mounts in the vid), as well as clever ways to extend battery life. Use them all.

This vid above comes at you pretty fast, so feel free to ask questions and I’ll jump into the comments and answer. Got GoPro tips / thoughts / hacks of your own? Do share ‘em.

The Artist as Athlete as Artist –> Travis Rice on Creativity + Art Galleries + Taking Risks

chase jarvis travis rice

Yours truly and Travis Rice getting motley at the...um...airport

The name Travis Rice has for some time been synonymous with the best snowboarder in the world. Literally, of that caliber. Which for those more inclined to the details, that means insane big mountain snowboarding and epic snowboarding films and photoshoots all over the world (watch him on #cjLIVE here). While “artist” may not be a descriptor that comes to mind when one thinks of Travis, I beg to differ. Individual sports like snow / skate / surf are are incredibly creative BUT ALSO…in case there was any doubt… Travis’ latest endeavor takes the artist part of this whole message to another level. You see, Trav recently kicked off an art gallery representing / showing artists, photographers, painters, etc, who focus on these sports…called Asymbol. There’s a physical gallery (in Jackson Hole, WY) + an amazing (affordable) online gallery here (but more on that later). Since I’m someone who came up photographically through the action sports genre myself, it’s clear to me that what Travis is doing is connecting the dots – tearing down walls, really – between athlete and artist. This approach is near and dear to me, not just because of my respect for his vision, but because in my early career I really thought I had to EITHER be and athlete or an artist – and it wasn’t until discovering the punk rock ethic of the early action sports scene that I realized I could be keep my jock-y roots and go deep into art – that I didn’t need to fit into stereotypes, I could be my own. Travis is amplifying that ethos with Asymbol. Now, given my schedule and T’s schedule, connecting in person to chat about this new project was no easy feat, but we managed to wrangle some time over a beer and a shot of whiskey at…an airport bar recently (really – so you’d better read this whole damn interview) to ask him a few questions that will interest you, my dear reader.

1) Alrighty man, tell us about your new(ish) endeavor Asymbol. What is the name all about too?

Asymbol is a gallery + art brand I started with Mike Parillo a few years ago. It’s about honoring and connecting with the art of board riding culture – from snowboarding to surfing to skateboarding. There are incredible working artists who’ve emerged from this creative culture and are in the process of transcending it. We felt there wasn’t a gallery that was really focused on it, so we made one.

The name Asymbol has sort of a double meaning. On the one hand, it refers to the symbolic nature of art and what it stands for in terms of pushing cultural boundaries and challenging our beliefs. On the other hand, it also refers to the act of assembly, in the sense of building community, making products and bringing people and ideas together for a common purpose.

Asymbol Owl, by Hydro74 aka Joshua M. Smith

2) How is this different than creative pursuits of the past for you? You’ve made movies, done contests, been a part of companies…how is Asymbol different?

Asymbol is different in that it’s really about creating a community of people around the art and the artists we’re working with. Making a film (like the Art of Flight) or putting on contest like Ultra Natural are super intense projects, but at the end of the day, they’re still projects. Asymbol doesn’t really have a definitive end – it just keeps evolving as the art and the community evolve.

It’s also different in that we’re focused more on artistic curation than raw artistic creation – that’s the job of the artists we work with. As I see it, our job is to find ways to build support for our artists and their art so that they can keep on doing what they love.

3) What do you hope to bring to the world with this new company?

I’d be happy if people spent some time on the Asymbol website exploring who these artists are and what messages and meaning they’re trying to convey through their art. What I love is that each piece tells a unique story — about the artist and what they were thinking and doing at the time they created the work. It might be a painting by Scott Lenhardt or a photo by Danny Zapalac that look nothing like each other, but the common elements are the stories that relate back to the culture of board riding.

One of the things we’re trying to do is make art more accessible. So much of our audience is younger and doesn’t necessarily think of themselves as fine art buyers, so we’re focused on innovating unique applications of our art on things like screenprinted canvas, t-shirts, laptop skins, water bottles and cases for mobile devices. These things still allow people to connect with the art very directly, but also serve a practical purpose. Plus, they just look rad. [my note --> feel free to buy some fresh stuff here.]

Craig Kelly Mural, by Scott Lenhardt

4) How do you run a business like Asymbol AND be a pro snowboarder? When do you sleep?

Sleep? What’s sleep? In truth, Asymbol is run by a small and dedicated team back home in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. I stay connected to them when I’m traveling, but my schedule gets pretty insane. It’s hard to have a conference call from the back seat of an A Star helicopter, but we’ve done it.

5) Who’s this rockstar Alex Hillinger?

Alex came into Asymbol last fall as my partner in the business. Mike and I met Alex through the art and tech conference he puts on every year called the GOAT, so his connection to Asymbol was a natural one. We really wanted to take Asymbol to the next level and we needed someone who understood what we were all about. Alex is crazy about snowboarding and art and his background in online business is really important if we’re going to grow Asymbol to where we all believe it can go. [another note from me --> for those who don't know, Alex has been a personal + professional advisor to me for years...helping make cjINC, #cjLIVE and even creativeLIVE work...hats off to him.)

6) What makes "Art" in your opinion?

That's a good question and I'm sure everyone has a different opinion about what makes art. For me, it's about being willing to put yourself out there and take risks. It's easy to sit back and say 'it's all been done before.' Artists don't let that stop them, they create ways to express their points of view that require them to get outside their comfort zones. Making art is risky and forces us to confront our fears of failure and of being misunderstood. I have a lot of respect for artists who don't play it safe. It may not always work, but it's really the only way to get to a place where it does.

7) What parallels do you see in art and sport? People always assume that one has to be jock or artist - is that true?

It seems to me that a lot of athletes gravitate to art as a means of self expression. Being an athlete involves taking risks -- especially if you're dropping into a spine for the first time, or riding a giant wave somewhere in the Indian Ocean. There's no reason there has to be a barrier between being a jock or an artist, and maybe that's one of the things we're saying with Asymbol. So many of our artists are also incredible athletes like Jamie Lynn or Adam Haynes. Parillo took gold this year at my luge course event, which was huge! The competition was fierce.

Red, by Chris Burkhart

8) Who are your influences as an athlete? Who are your influences as an artist?

There are so many — guys like Guch and Johan Olofsson and Craig Kelly who really pioneered big mountain freeriding. Terje and Jamie Lynn are still charging it today with style.

For artists, I’m way into the work of Andrew Schoultz, Carl E. Smith, Todd Glaser and of course, Mike Parillo who I’ve been collaborating with on graphics for years.

9) How is it running an art gallery in Jackson Hole, WY? Would it be better if you were in NYC or SF or something? Why or why not?

Jackson’s a big art town, it’s just mostly Western art of things like bronzed eagle sculptures and cowboys on horseback. I think it makes a lot of sense for Asymbol to be based in Jackson though. This place attracts people seeking to push the boundaries of athleticism and adventure that’s hard to do in a city. There’s an aspect of Asymbol that’s about freedom and openness that being in Jackson embodies in a lot of ways. It’s also nice for me in that Jackson is my home, so when I’m back from traveling, I can really focus on it without the distractions of a place like NYC or SF.

Thanks Travis. You are radical. Follow Travis across these channels:

Asymbol Website
Facebook
Twitter

15 Tips for Creatives to Get the Most Legal Bang for Your Legal Buck

Contracts can be a nightmare. I’ve never loved contracts even for a hot second, but fortunately I’ve surrounded myself with an awesome Executive Producer who really likes them — Kate (she’s also my wife), and a great lawyer or two. We know what a pain point this can be for creatives everywhere, so we sat down and pulled together a series of 15 tips aimed to help you navigate these messy waters. We know legal advice can be ridiculously expensive and is often hard to afford/want to pay for, however, in order to run a successful biz, the need for some legal work is inevitable… The trick is to find a balance between spending and managing risk.

To help strike that balance, here the list we use to keep our bills as low as possible and still meet that baseline of comfort.

1. Find a lawyer before you need a lawyer. While the task may sound daunting, it is way, way, way better to make the time early so you don’t feel rushed in an already stressful situation. Start by asking for recommendations from friends, industry acquaintances and local professional organizations and develop a short list of options. Then meet with a few attorneys to find the best fit. Take advantage of this initial meeting time to share your philosophy and get on the same page. This will save you time and money later. If at all possible, try working on a few projects together to see how it goes.

2. Find a lawyer that is a good match for your personality and your needs. When we were on the hunt for legal counsel, here was our list of wants:

_understands copyright, intellectual property and contract law,
_great at explaining law in layman’s terms,
_understands our business, budget and goals,
_has the necessary technology to work together (document compatibility),
_has time for us, and
_is pleasant to work with.

3. Understand how lawyers bill. Most lawyers bill in 15 minute increments, so keep your eye on the clock! This includes any and all time working for you, so that means reading email, phone calls or working on your project. Being prepared and organized will save you money. You will also be charged for miscellaneous items like making copies, sending faxes, editing documents, etc, so you may want to take over some of those tasks if it makes sense.

Some firms want you to pay an advance fee or retainer, where you pay a certain amount in advance and then are billed against that amount as work is completed. These types of agreements are common and pretty fair, but if you can avoid paying in advance, that is always preferred. If not, negotiate any prepayment as low as possible and never sign up for more time than you think you will use from the firm in a reasonable amount of time – these fees are nonrefundable.

4. Manage costs. Since writing legal documents is an art, there is no one definitive way to express an idea. That said, you can get in editing loops that could go on and on. To avoid this, it is really important to communicate clearly about your needs for every project.

Some other tips:

_provide a per project budget,
_ask for notification if your monthly bill exceeds a certain amount and
_provide some direction on the type of feedback you want

For example, some standard agreements are just that… standard, so I instruct our legal to look for red flags only (after I have read it). In other instances, we may be entering into a very unique type of deal, so we may need more customization. Even in the latter case, you should keep track of time to keep a pulse on the budget.

5. Take advantage of the resources offered by professional organizations. I especially love the American Society of Media Photographers. Among other great member benefits, they offer a wealth of helpful legal information including:
tutorials on bad contracts, copyright, releases, licensing, and more and sample forms like releases, contracts, etc. granted, you will want to customize/localize with your lawyer if at all possible, but it’s a great starting place that will save you time, money and headaches.

6. Create templates when possible. You will find that you use the same documents over and over and you should have solid versions/template of each that can be customized as needed. Start with standardized documents from your professional organization or law firm and work with your lawyer to make them appropriate to your business. Here’s a list of standard documents that would be helpful to have at your fingertips and customize:

_photographer agreement
_estimate, delivery memo, change order and invoice
_model release
_property release
_contractor agreement (for individuals you are hiring)
_non-disclosure agreement

7. Create systems. Whenever you find yourself encountering they same types of legal requests, see if there is a way to standardize or at least create a system for vetting the document so you don’t start from scratch each time. For example, we are often asked to signed Non-Disclosure Agreements before hearing about projects. Every client has their standard document, so I worked with our counsel to create a way for me to vet each before going to our legal. See our earlier post about NDAs HERE.

8. Use a term sheet. A term sheet is a short, bullet-point document, usually one-page, that summarizes the project and specifies the essential terms of your forthcoming agreement. This is a great way to go because it gets all parties on the same page in plain English… and FAST. This ‘cheat sheet’ is a guide to help the legal team translate the project into a formal legal format. Term sheets can be binding or non-binding… that means, enforceable by law or just clarifying. Either can work, it just depends on your needs.

9. Embrace the process. The longer I’m at it, the more I see the process around most legal issues as an opportunity to build a strong relationships with those we want to do biz with. The process gives both sides a chance –through good communication– to really understand the terms and expectations and avoid surprises later. If done well, everyone walks away feeling like they they are winning. And that’s a great way to start a relationship.

10. Understand your lawyers limitations. A lawyer only is as good as the information you provide them with and you know your business way better than your lawyer does. So, you have to work together to end up with a great contract. Think about the deal and make sure you have addressed everything you think is important. I always explain the project and ask myself: what is missing? I always ask my lawyer: what should I be asking?

11. Unravel the mystery of ‘boilerplate.’ Boilerplate is the standard parts of a contract that you almost always need, like confidentiality, severability, assignment, relationship of the parties, governing law and so on. It’s a great idea to work with your lawyer to understand these kinds of standard sections…AND you still need to read them every time! Seemingly small changes can have big impacts.

12. Take advantage of redlining. In word processing, you can track any changes made by either party as you are editing, suggesting changes and making comments. This redline shows up in a different color the document with a note of who made the change so that others can see the changes that have been made. It makes going back and forth on documents so much easier!

13. Ask questions/do the research. Use your lawyer, resources online and the process to educate yourself. As you start to understand more, you will be able to ask better questions and avoid pitfalls before you get too far down the line in the legal process. For example, you don’t want to wait until the contract phase of the process to find out that the client wants to hire you to do work for hire (they own the copyright) if you prefer to license your work (you own the copyright).

14. Evaluate risk. All deals have some amount of risk and and you want to mitigate as much as possible. A good lawyer excels at helping you understand your risk so you can make the best decisions… it’s up to you to make the call on what your are willing to sign up for.

15. Read and understand anything + everything you sign. This seem obvious, is essential and yet way too often does not happen. All deals have some risk and you must understand how much risk you are assuming. A lawyer is great for highlighting where you are exposed so that you can make an informed decision. I always pay special, bonus attention to certain sections, like warranties, representation, indemnification and copyright sections.

Bonus: A good thing to remember is that contracts are a good sign… it means that you have new business opportunities and that is exciting.

Hope this list helps you navigate around a few headaches and onto the creative stuff you really want to be doing. Good luck.

chasejarvisRAW: Sea to Sky Photo Shoot in Belize [Plus How to Pull This Off Like a Pro]

Quick share here….. a short while back I took my very first trip to Belize for what turned into a really, really (2 reallys – or now that’s three) high value, pain-free shoot. I’ve been so very lucky to have shot in some of the most spectacular places in the world — and just added Belize to that list.

We banged out a fun BTS vid to share some of the splendor, but also to give you a peek into some additional forthcoming BTS/helpful vids we’ll spin out that will add value to your future visits here, including aerial, underwater, and gear-packing / travel hacks. And if you’re thinking “Belize is so damn far away”…it’s not really. For USA’ers it’s closer than you think – only 5 hours SEA to Belize city (same as NYC), so every other desitnation in the USA, save AK + HI are even closer, and it transports you to a whole new world of blue green water, endless tiny white sand islands, and some of the most famous dive destinations on the planet. Our plane tix were pretty reasonable and lodging even moreso.

Enjoy the vid. If you missed earlier BTS snapshots from the trip and want to circle back there’s some here. And for those who are curious about how best to pull off the logistics of a trip/job like this, here’s a 4-part series on how to travel for photo + video shoots like a boss….

Part 1 – 10 Mission Critical Tips for Booking Photo and Video Travel – getting there
Part 2 – 12 Mission Critical Tips for Pre-Production – tips BEFORE traveling
Part 3 – 12 Tips for Travel Packing – tips on what to take
Part 4 – 8 Mission Critical Tips for Being on the Road

More soon – be creative until then. Happy to answer questions if you got ‘em.

How to Shoot [photograph] Fireworks

Happy Birthday USA!
Quick and Dirty Tips for Shooting Fireworks:

[If you want an in-depth step by step check out the video above from creativeLIVE]

1. Use a Tripod
You’ll want to make sure your camera is stable and secure. Check out some support systems here.

2. Remote Release
Invest in a remote release device. You can also use the timer shutter release function – but a remote release is the best option.

3. ISO
Shoot a low ISO. I recommend 100.

4. Focal Length
Timing is key with fireworks. You’re going to have to anticipate where the action is happening before it happens. This can be tricky if you’re shooting with a longer focal length and trying to stay tight. A wider focal length makes this easier, but experiment a bit. Zoom in and see if you get lucky. If you shoot wide, you can always go back and crop for the desired effect as well.

5. Aperture
Fireworks are BRIGHT. You dont need a really fast lens and the general consensus is that somewhere between f/8 to f/16 will work.

6. Shutter Speed
Shutter speed is going to be the most important aspect of your fireworks capture. A long exposure is what you’re going to want to go for. Shooting “bulb” with a remote release is the best technique. Hit the shutter as the firework is about to explode and hold it down until it’s finished. This could be a few seconds. At the same time,
don’t keep your shutter open too long. Remember: Fireworks are BRIGHT. Just because its dark doesnt mean that you wont completely blow out your photos if you keep the shutter open too long.

7. Framing
Get to your location a bit early. What’s in the foreground and background? Try to figure our where the fireworks are being set up and where they will end up in they sky. You will have to aim before the fireworks go off. If you are really on it – ask the folks coordinating the display for some advance information. This will be a big help. Consider your lens selection before the show start. Are you going to shoot horizontal or vertical? Dont forget how you’ve framed it up because when you’re in the dark, you might spend a lot of time looking directly at the fireworks display rather than through the viewfinder.

8. “No flash photography”
A flash will do nothing but crush your photos and leave you with smoke…turn it off or leave it at home.

Have a great Fourth of July and share some of these photos in the comments section for Thursday morning!

Super Camera — Arri Alexa is the Pro’s Best Friend [plus how I shot the Samsung video ]

You may recall a few weeks back I released a video of the behind-the-scenes action for a cool gig I was asked to create for Samsung around their Series 9 Color Premium monitors. It was a dream job in a lot of ways. For one, I got to literally photograph a re-creation of my dreams; for two, on jobs like that I get the opportunity to rub elbows with the best crew —cinematographers, editors, filmers, sound technicians, art directors, stylists, producers and beyond — PLUS the best gear too.

When I laid out the earlier blog post detailing everything about my Samsung shoot I took a question from a guy named “Ben” off the ol’ innernets:

“Great cinematic look in your Samsung behind-the-scenes vid, Chase. What camera did you shoot it with?”

So I thought I would take this opportunity to a)highlight our primary cine camera on this shoot– the Arri Alexa; b)introduce my fav DP, Chris Bell, who shot that camera on my Samsung job (and a lot of my other stuff); and c) refresh that Samsung video in case you missed it the first go round.

So in reverse order, here’s the Samsung vid shot primarily with the Arri Alexa (below). And then – in addition to our video review (above) I asked him to share some more knowledge & opinion and he breaks it down quite nicely… all of which you’ll find after the Samsung vid here. Thanks Chris!

First of all, Chris, thanks for slaying it for me on the Samsung gig. Second, thanks for the quick interview – really appreciate the time discussing the Arri Alexa. When did you first pick up the Arri Alexa and what were you using previously that it replaced?

The Alexa replaced a lot of cameras. My background is as a film shooter (16-35 mm). And we had various cameras to get a particular look. Panasonic had various cameras. The HBX200. There were cameras like the Canon 5D and even the Red One. I had a shop full of cameras and each was there to satisfy a specific client’s need. Alexa came along and, in a way, became the swiss army knife of cameras. It replaced a lot of those cameras. Everyone [clients] wanted the big chip look. Everyone wanted the shallow depth of field look. For one reason or another the cameras that I mentioned could not satisfy all parts of the workflow in a consistent way. Red was a raw camera – which is nice, but it needs tons of post production attention. That’s a challenge. And no one wanted to shoot tape anymore.

arri alexa chase jarvis blogThe Alexa came along and answered a lot of producers, editors and cinematographers desires – all at the same time. It does a great job emulating film…and film is still state of the art in many ways. It is still the benchmark that cinematographers use to compare against. The Alexa was really the first to mimic the dyanamic range of film. It appeals to so many because it has a look clients love – that filmic “look”.

Prior to the Alexa someone in the workflow — the cinematographer, the editor or the producer, had to compromise on something. These other cameras, while amazing in some way, had very limtited range. They had lots of compression issues and color source issues. They had very challenging workflow issues. Then the Alexa comes along and all of a sudden – the cinematographer is happy, the producer and editor are happy. That it shoots files that are ready to edit right out of the camera –and require no conversion–makes workflow a snap.

arri alexa chase jarvis blog 2And it’s super simple in lots of other ways too…It has great time coding for instance. These are little things. But on big productions – on the big budget work that demands reliability, it is the little things that add up for the professional. And ultimately, this camera can be relied upon. It’s been used on major Hollywood productions like Skyfall and Life of Pi. It’s increasingly found on the set for TV commercials worldwide. It’s being used for wildlife docs. For me, I work on a lot of different types of productions – from commercials to sport, to big brands like Microsoft and Samsung–and beyond, and it always does me right. In short, I think that Arri has done a magnificent job listening to its users when developing the product.

What is your favorite piece of completed work (–ahem besides our Samsung video–) using the Alexa, that you could show off with?
Here are two:
12th Ave Iron Film:
National TV Spot for Acer

What’s the best thing about the Alexa from a usage standpoint?
The best thing is that its a camera that makes a beautiful image without compromise – for anyone involved with the workflow. It’s a swiss army knife that works on any type job. ESPN shooters are buying Alexa. The networks love it because the files are immediately edit-ready. It’s SO easy to use. And it has become a standard. I figured I’d get a three year usage (digital has a short shelf life), but I’ll get at least five years out of this camera. Arri has these very long product cycles. That’s very important. It means I can go on a shoot and no matter who’s shooting – we are all shooting the same quality image. This is super important from the business standpoint. We need to have time to recoup investment – b/c its not a cheap camera [$90,000]. My criticism of digital is that it all turns over too fast. It’s getting silly. Every six months there is a new “must have” camera.

arri alexa chase jarvis blog 3How does the average joe get to play with one of these bad boys? Or do they…
The average Joe could go to the Arri website – there is a simulator. They update it every time there is a software update. You can learn the menu system online. If you want to see it in person – call local rental houses and ask if there is a good time to come in and look at the camera and play with it. They might be up for that to get a new customer. Some rental houses have workshops too. You could go to the trade shows. There are lots of ways to do it without dropping the $90,000 cold turkey. Most rental houses are open to educating people.

What’s coming next in this class of camera in your opinion? How can it get even better?

Moore’s law is always in effect. Digital imaging tech is moving very quickly – there is going to be a day where there is a base camera with ISO 5000 and it will shoot 5000fps and it will cost $5000. On your very high end – everyone is going to continue to attempt to emulate the benchmark: motion film. Dynamic range, how they handle highlights, lights and dark and how accurately they are able to reproduce color space. These are the Model T’s of digital cameras. There is a big revolution coming with color and contrast. We’re getting away from a lot of the compromise. Heavy compression, limited colorspace, limited dynamic range. Manufacturers are hearing it and producing new cameras. But I really wish they would slow down a bit and not reinvent the wheel every nine months. Having a standard is important too. It’s rather dizzying.

Thanks Chris! More details on the Arri Alexa here via the Arri Group.

Let’s Have Dinner & Talk About Death [Kickstarter of the Week]

I didn’t talk about it much, but over the past month I lost two close family members in 48 hours. My grandmother passed away on Mother’s Day and my wife Kate’s grandmother passed away 2 days later. Neither was expected. As you might imagine, it was a crushing week (and following month) for our family. And now not a day goes by that I don’t think about them. More importantly, I’ve had a real chance to reflect on their lives — for which I wouldn’t change a thing — AND their deaths…for which I would change a lot.

In the USA in particular — but in many of the countries I’m familiar with — we don’t do well with death. We don’t talk about it enough, we don’t like to think about it and, consequently, as a culture we don’t do well with arguably the most important part of our lives…the final chapter. Did you know that 75% of people say that they would prefer to die at home, but only 25% end up doing so? Did you know that end of life expense is the number one reason for bankruptcy in the US? This is not dignity. This is terrible.

And that is the point of this kickstarter campaign by my dear friend Michael Hebb. We’ve done loads of collaborations together, like SongsForEatingAndDrinking, where we’ve hosted the likes of Macklemore and Pearl Jam guys and many others. I know the power of conversation around a meal – and have experienced the power of action rising up from the table. If anyone can start the movement to talk about death that will change our current approach, it’s Hebb. Michael, plus the University of Washington’s Masters of Communication Learning program, an interactive firm CIVILIZATION, Engage with Grace and some of the nation’s leading health and wellness organizations are working to fully launch their www.deathoverdinner.org, a project which will hope to jumpstart the national dialogue on how we End our Lives.

I encourage you all to join me in supporting it here. Much thanks and love.

How to Make Money Selling Drugs — A Public Service Announcement


Just a personal note to YOU from my homie, actor Adrian Grenier [Entourage]… He is stoked to announce the LA, NY, Seattle, Portland & Atlanta theatrical opening for his latest documentary film How to Make Money Selling Drugs. I have seen the movie – it’s fantastic. An interesting twisted approach to awareness around the causes and effects of the whole drug war enchilada…

If you’ve ever wondered about the failed, resource-sucking drug war (or you thought we were “doing the right thing”), do yourself a favor buy a ticket for this weekend’s theatrical opening here in the USA. Or, if you’re not in one of these locations (or not in the USA), it’s available for streaming/download on iTunes HERE.

From the IFC: “Subversive and satirical, this documentary offers a fresh take on a serious subject. Through investigative reporting and surprising interviews with subjects ranging from Susan Sarandon to Eminem and Russell Simmons, it illustrates step-by-step how to create a drug empire, from dealing on the corner to running a major cartel. Laying bare the inequities in the legal system and the ways that criminalization breeds violence, the film builds a powerful case for radically rethinking drug policy.” This fresh look explores the rise of actual drug dealers and exposes a $400 billion dollar industry that our government [and many governments worldwide] is happy to keep intact.

For detailed theater and show time info, go HERE.

Thanks for spreading the word for Adrian and yours truly. Any word of mouth/posts/social is greatly appreciated. Together we can shed some light on a dark corner of the world.

[You might remember Adrian's guest appearance on cjLIVE last April. Some great insight into the entertainment industry and what it means to be a creative in Hollywood. Well worth the [re]watch —> HERE]

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